Keep It Moving

Twenty years ago, I wrote a book called The Creative Habit, sharing the message that we can all live creative lives if only we could stop waiting for a muse to arrive with divine inspiration and instead just get down to work. In other words, you too can be more creative if you are willing to sweat a little. This message still resonates when I lecture. But, interestingly, the question I am most often asked after a talk these days is on a different topic entirely: “How do you keep working?” The subtext here, sotto voce, is “… at your age?” Which is seventy-eight.

To me it is simple. I continue to work as I always have, expecting each day to build on the one before. And I do not see why I should not continue to work in this spirit.

Keep It Moving is intended to encourage those who wish to maintain their prime a very long time. Like most books of practical advice, it identifies a “disease” and offers a cure. That disease, simply put, is our fear of time passing and the resulting aging process. The remedy? The book in your hands.

I flirted with the idea of calling this book The Youth Habit. I liked the suggestion that youth’s virtues could be easily transplanted into our post-youth years if only we followed a routine: take the stairs, use sunscreen, ingest more omega-3s and fewer omega-6s, don’t shortchange yourself on sleep. Cut out sugar, do something nice for someone else daily, floss, read more, watch less, love the one you’re with, and it’s okay to drink wine (until the next study says it isn’t). Sounded like a bestseller to me.

But if experience has taught me anything, it’s that chasing youth is a losing proposition. There’s little benefit in looking back, at least not with yearning or nostalgia or any other melancholy humor. To look back is to cling to something well over and behind you. We don’t lose youth. Youth stays put. We move on. We need to face the fact that aging will happen to us along with everybody else and just get on with it. Growing older is a strange stew of hope, despair, courage—still I think you will agree—it is light-years ahead of the alternative.

I don’t promise eternal youth in Keep It Moving. I have no interest in sugarcoating the aging process. What I believe in is change and the vitality it brings. Vitality means moving through life with energy and vigor, making deliberate choices and putting to good use the time and energy that we have been granted. You have, no doubt, seen people in their late seventies or even into their nineties who don’t seem worn out by their years but instead welcome the opportunity to be truly present in their bodies and in their minds. Instead of stubbornly staying on known paths, afraid to stray, they look at what comes next with curiosity, expanding into whatever it may be.

So, no, this book is not The Youth Habit. Nor is it The Creative Habit—which promotes regularity in living and working—because as we grow older, it is just as important to break habits as it is to make them.

I want to reprogram how you think about aging by getting rid of two corrosive ideas. First, that you need to emulate youth, resolving to live in a corner of the denial closet marked “reserved for aged.” Second, that your life must contract with time. Let’s start by breaking some old thought patterns.

I’ve danced my entire life (and still do) and I’ve spent time with many great performers. For these dancers and athletes, the passage of time presents mostly difficult realities. The jump declines, speed diminishes, flexibility is challenged. And fear of decline and irrelevance starts early.

Years ago, I was sitting in a coffee shop with a dancer of remarkable talents, Mikhail Baryshnikov. We had just finished one of the early rehearsals for Push Comes to Shove, a ballet I wrote for him. Even then it was clear that he was a phenomenon, one of the very greatest classical dancers of the twentieth century. Though he was in his prime, he was looking morose as we drank our coffee. I asked him, “Misha, what’s the matter? You don’t like what we’re doing?” No, he said, he loved what we were doing; “But,” he added, “soon we will be old.” He was all of twenty-seven. And yet I understood.

For dancers, aging is ever in front of us as we work. We face it each time we enter the studio, one day older than the day before. But who among us in the civilian population has not shared the feeling that they, too, will be finished by forty? It needles when things don’t work the way they used to. And it doesn’t help that, gradually, as joints begin to ache and memory to slip, we are bombarded by negative messages from our culture. Older adults are frequently portrayed as out of touch, useless, feeble, incompetent, pitiful, and irrelevant. Sadly, these dismal expectations can become self-fulfilling, creating the bias that fuels our roaring age industry—pills, diets, special cosmetics, surgery—all promising to send time reeling backward. But no. Time goes only one way: forward.

The result? Frustration becomes a habit. Little indignities become a reason to rant and complain. But that scenario will bleed out your spirit, take away your resiliencies. If you go into situations always expecting to be cheated or deprived, you’ll likely find ways to tell yourself that is exactly what has happened. Don’t go searching for things that confirm or fuel your sense of indignation. It will become a default mind-set promoting more of the same.

Let’s agree:

Age is not the enemy. Stagnation is the enemy. Complacency is the enemy. Stasis is the enemy. Attempting to maintain the status quo, smoothing our skin, and keeping our tummies trim become distractions that obscure a larger truth. Attempting to freeze your life in time at any point is totally destructive to the prospect of a life lived well and fully. All animate creatures are destroyed when frozen. They do not move. This is not a worthy goal.

However, the forces that create inertia in our lives are difficult to resist for they are hardwired into us. People prefer to keep going along as they always have rather than make a decision that would knock them out of their groove, even when it would be relatively easy to change course. Behavioral scientists refer to this as status quo bias. We succumb to this bias with habits large and small, from an inability to give up our three cups of coffee a day to staying with a partner long after it’s clear that the relationship is over. The devil best known becomes our buddy.

Along with status quo bias, there is another habit I’d like to undo. As we get older and our bodies enjoy less natural freedom of movement, we tend to take up less space, both physically and metaphorically. Here’s the endpoint of this tendency: our backs arch forward, no longer straight and long. Our steps shorten from a stride to a shuffle. Our vision narrows, slowly erasing the periphery, leaving only what’s in front of our nose. No wonder we prefer remaining at home, our life lived in fewer and fewer rooms. We let our bodies constrict, inviting the world around us to close in.

The mind will follow the body’s contraction. On this path, our concerns narrow down to the most elemental functions: what to eat, getting enough sleep, keeping an appointment.

Contraction is not inevitable. You can resist and reverse.

Now to form some new habits. I hope in these pages to get you to wake up and move more. After all, I repeat, to move is the provenance of all living human beings. And by my definition, to move is to dance. With the time you’ve got, choose to make your life bigger. Opt for expression over observation, action instead of passivity, risk over safety, the unknown over the familiar. Be deliberate, act with intention. Chase the sublime and the absurd. Make each day one where you emerge, unlock, excite, and discover. Find new, reconsider old, become limber, stretch, lean, move … I say this with love: shut up and dance. That was the advice I gave myself for my sixty-fifth birthday. You might want to start now.

I will try to help. Each chapter includes an approach to moving that can be practiced by the beginner as well as the advanced. These exercises are reflective of simple actions we all use every day. Begin now.

TAKE UP SPACE

When your muscles stretch rather than constrict, you expand your share of the planet. You take up more space, not less. Dancers know this intuitively. They are taught to move so that every gesture is not only more precise and elegant but bigger. We call it amplitude. It is not enough to state an arabesque; it must be opened in every direction to its full expanse. In order to be seen, the dancer must occupy maximum volume. You can think the same way in your everyday movements.

  • When you walk, think of yourself striding, not just taking mingy steps.
  • Greeting a friend, reach your arm out, whether to shake a hand or give a hug, with amplitude and full fellow feeling. Be robust.
  • During a meeting, spread your belongings out across the table instead of gathering them tidily in your lap. Speak out. Take up mental space as well.

There is logic in our movement. Remember, when we walk, we go forward. We can move backward, but we are not designed for this. Forward is our natural way.

Think of this all as your personal Occupy More Space protest.

With this in mind, consider what would happen if you continued to conduct your life beyond forty-five to arrive at seventy-five as a powerful beginning point, where, honed and strengthened by experience, you could use a lifetime’s efforts to give yourself new options in both how you address work and how you live with those you love. Why not insist on continuing to make fundamental choices for yourself, not leaving it to chance and “how things will be”? Why not evaluate your accomplishments as beginnings rather than endings.

Amass the experiences and grow into the person you were meant to be. One of the first lessons in the studio is that if you want to be something, you’ve got to train to be it over and over. Master cellist Pablo Casals was asked late in life, “Why practice at age ninety-one?” “Because I am making progress” was his answer. Right!

Practice growth. This is one habit I encourage you to cultivate. What you do today is an investment in tomorrow. With that in mind, to the list of desirable states of emotional equilibrium that end in “-ness”—for example, wellness, mindfulness, forgiveness, friendliness, decisiveness, hopefulness, and the really big one, happiness—let me add a personal favorite: expansiveness. Moving out is moving on, time and space working in tandem. Expansiveness is a factor of the following four ingredients:

  1. Intention is the umbrella term for our desires, ambitions, and designs for the future. Intention defines our next move, and the next, and the one after that. It’s how we plan and control our life. Without it, we’re either marching in place or losing ground.
  2. Honest appraisal of the past is how we deal with the inevitable setbacks, failures, and embarrassments life hands us. Without it, we cannot self-correct or recover. We will be forever mired in regret and guilt, wanting to change what we’ve already done to create a new outcome. Only happens in science fiction.
  3. Anger about the past is the killer emotion. It’s noise not signal. Crank it up to high volume and it cancels out the sound of our best intentions.
  4. Energy and time are self-explanatory, but as tools they are force multipliers. If you have an abundance of time and energy but waste it by getting stuck in the stale routines of the past, you have no chance of moving forward.

If we can husband and direct our time and energy, the quality of each day or year will spring from a marriage of intention and disciplined effort rather than a reliance on luck or genetic birthright. We make a choice. We invest our time and energy. We reap the reward or take the hit. Whatever the result, we are constantly working on what comes next. We earn our life.

Make a contract with your future. Facing new habits requires accountability. Here are the terms and conditions of our agreement:

  • Acknowledge you have choices. Make them.
  • Your body will be a big part of this deal and you will be ready and able to use it.
  • You will be okay to reidentify yourself often along the way.
  • Obstacles—you will meet many—go around, over, under, or through. Again often.
  • Bounce back—yes, many, many times.
  • Up is preferred to down.
  • Stamina is your bailiwick. Train. Train more.
  • Bend in the wind.
  • Get stronger for the mending.
  • Dance is being in motion. You are doing it. Do it more.

What I want us to do is abandon our infatuation with the status quo and jettison our aversion to every form of risk, acknowledge we are getting older; pledge to get over it and get moving.

That’s the deal. Turn the page. chapter 1 : Terms and ConditionsTwenty years ago, I wrote a book called, sharing the message that we can all live creative lives if lone we could stop waiting for a muse to arrive with divine inspiration and rather just get down to work. In early words, you besides can be more creative if you are will to sweat a little. This message hush resonates when I lecture. But, interestingly, the interrogate I am most often asked after a talk these days is on a different topic wholly : “ How do you keep working ? ” The subtext here, , is “ … at your senesce ? ” Which is seventy-eight.To me it is simple. I continue to work as I always have, expecting each day to build on the one ahead. And I do not see why I should not continue to work in this spirit.is intended to encourage those who wish to maintain their prime a very long time. Like most books of practical advice, it identifies a “ disease ” and offers a remedy. That disease, simply put, is our fear of time authorize and the resulting senesce march. The remedy ? The script in your hands.I flirted with the theme of calling this bookI liked the suggestion that youth ’ second virtues could be easily transplanted into our post-youth years if lone we followed a everyday : take the stairs, manipulation sunscreen, ingest more omega-3 fatty acid and fewer omega-6 fatty acid, don ’ thymine shortchange yourself on sleep. Cut out sugar, do something nice for person else daily, floss, read more, watch less, love the one you ’ re with, and it ’ s approve to drink wine ( until the following study says it isn ’ thymine ). Sounded like a best seller to me.But if experience has taught me anything, it ’ sulfur that chasing youth is a fall back proposition. There ’ south little benefit in looking back, at least not with yearning or nostalgia or any other black bile liquid body substance. To look back is to cling to something well over and behind you. We don ’ t suffer youth. Youth stays put. We move on. We need to face the fact that aging will happen to us along with everybody else and precisely get on with it. Growing older is a foreign fret of hope, despair, courage—still I think you will agree—it is light year ahead of the alternative.I preceptor ’ t promise ageless young inI have no pastime in sugarcoating the aging work. What I believe in is change and the energy it brings. Vitality means moving through life sentence with energy and vigor, making debate choices and putting to good use the time and department of energy that we have been granted. You have, no doubt, seen people in their late seventies or even into their nineties who don ’ deoxythymidine monophosphate seem worn out by their years but rather welcome the opportunity to be rightfully introduce in their bodies and in their minds. alternatively of stubbornly staying on known paths, afraid to stray, they look at what comes following with curiosity, expanding into whatever it may be.So, no, this book is notNor is it—which promotes regularity in living and working—because as we grow older, it is barely deoxyadenosine monophosphate crucial to break habits as it is to make them.I want to reprogram how you think about aging by getting rid of two caustic ideas. First, that you need to emulate young, resolving to live in a corner of the denial cupboard marked “ reserved for aged. ” Second, that your life must compress with fourth dimension. Let ’ s get down by breaking some old thought patterns.I ’ ve danced my entire life ( and still do ) and I ’ ve exhausted time with many bang-up performers. For these dancers and athletes, the passage of time presents by and large unmanageable realities. The startle declines, speed diminishes, flexibility is challenged. And fear of refuse and irrelevance starts early.Years ago, I was sitting in a coffee shop with a dancer of remarkable talents, Mikhail Baryshnikov. We had just finished one of the early rehearsals for, a ballet I wrote for him. even then it was clear that he was a phenomenon, one of the very greatest authoritative dancers of the twentieth hundred. Though he was in his prime, he was looking dark as we drank our coffee. I asked him, “ Misha, what ’ s the matter ? You don ’ thymine like what we ’ re doing ? ” No, he said, he loved what we were doing ; “ But, ” he added, “ soon we will be old. ” He was all of twenty-seven. And yet I understood.For dancers, aging is ever in presence of us as we work. We face it each time we enter the studio, one sidereal day older than the day before. But who among us in the civilian population has not shared the feel that they, excessively, will be finished by forty ? It needles when things don ’ deoxythymidine monophosphate work the way they used to. And it doesn ’ thymine help that, gradually, as joints begin to ache and memory to slip, we are bombarded by damaging messages from our culture. Older adults are frequently portrayed as out of allude, useless, feeble, incompetent, deplorable, and irrelevant. deplorably, these blue expectations can become self-fulfilling, creating the bias that fuels our thunder age industry—pills, diets, particular cosmetics, surgery—all promise to send meter reeling backward. But no. time goes entirely one way : forward.The result ? Frustration becomes a habit. short indignities become a reason to rant and complain. But that scenario will bleed out your heart, take away your resiliencies. If you go into situations always expecting to be cheated or deprived, you ’ ll likely find ways to tell yourself that is precisely what has happened. Don ’ deoxythymidine monophosphate go searching for things that confirm or fuel your sense of indignation. It will become a default mentality promoting more of the same.Let ’ s agree : Age is not the enemy. stagnation is the enemy. complacency is the enemy. stasis is the enemy. Attempting to maintain the condition quo, smoothing our skin, and keeping our tummies trim become distractions that obscure a larger truth. Attempting to freeze your life in fourth dimension at any detail is wholly destructive to the candidate of a biography lived well and fully. All animize creatures are destroyed when frozen. They do not move. This is not a worthy goal.However, the forces that create inertia in our lives are unmanageable to resist for they are hardwired into us. People prefer to keep going along as they constantly have preferably than make a decisiveness that would knock them out of their groove, evening when it would be relatively comfortable to change course. behavioral scientists refer to this asWe succumb to this bias with habits large and little, from an inability to give up our three cups of coffee bean a day to staying with a collaborator long after it ’ mho acquit that the relationship is over. The hellion best known becomes our buddy.Along with condition quo bias, there is another habit I ’ d like to undo. As we get older and our bodies enjoy less natural exemption of movement, we tend to take up less space, both physically and metaphorically. here ’ s the end point of this tendency : our backs arch forward, no longer true and long. Our steps shorten from a pace to a shamble. Our vision narrows, slowly erasing the periphery, leaving only what ’ sulfur in movement of our intrude. No wonder we prefer remaining at base, our life lived in fewer and fewer rooms. We let our bodies constrict, inviting the world around us to close in.The take care will follow the body ’ south compression. On this path, our concerns narrow down to the most elemental functions : what to eat, getting adequate sleep, keeping an appointment.Contraction is not inevitable. You can resist and reverse.Now to form some raw habits. I hope in these pages to get you to wake up and move more. After all, I repeat, to move is the birthplace of all living homo beings. And by my definition, to move is to dance. With the time you ’ ve got, choose to make your animation bigger. Opt for formulation over observation, action rather of passivity, risk over base hit, the stranger over the familiar. Be consider, act with intention. Chase the exalted and the absurd. Make each day one where you emerge, unlock, stimulate, and detect. Find newfangled, reconsider old, become limber, stretch, tend, move … I say this with love : shut up and dance. That was the advice I gave myself for my sixty-fifth birthday. You might want to start now.I will try to help. Each chapter includes an approach to moving that can be practiced by the founder vitamin a well as the advanced. These exercises are brooding of simple actions we all use every day. Begin now. TAKE UP SPACEWhen your muscles stretch quite than constrict, you expand your share of the planet. You take up more space, not less. Dancers know this intuitively. They are taught to move sol that every gesture is not only more accurate and elegant but bigger. We call it. It is not enough to state an arabesque ; it must be opened in every steering to its full sweep. In order to be seen, the dancer must occupy maximum book. You can think the lapp way in your everyday movements.There is logic in our bowel movement. Remember, when we walk, we go forward. We can move backward, but we are not designed for this. Forward is our natural way.Think of this all as your personal Occupy More Space protest.With this in judgment, consider what would happen if you continued to conduct your life beyond forty-five to arrive at seventy-five as a powerful beginning point, where, honed and strengthened by experience, you could use a life ’ mho efforts to give yourself new options in both how you address work and how you live with those you love. Why not insist on continuing to make cardinal choices for yourself, not leaving it to opportunity and “ how things will be ” ? Why not evaluate your accomplishments as beginnings rather than endings.Amass the experiences and grow into the person you were meant to be. One of the first lessons in the studio is that if you want to be something, you ’ ve got to train to be it over and over. Master cellist Pablo Casals was asked deep in life, “ Why rehearse at senesce ninety-one ? ” “ Because I am making build up ” was his answer. right ! Practice growth. This is one substance abuse I encourage you to cultivate. What you do today is an investment in tomorrow. With that in thinker, to the list of desirable states of emotional equilibrium that end in “ -ness ” —for exercise, health, mindfulness, forgiveness, friendliness, decisiveness, hopefulness, and the in truth adult one, happiness—let me add a personal favored : Moving out is moving on, time and space working in tandem. Expansiveness is a agent of the following four ingredients : If we can husband and direct our time and energy, the quality of each sidereal day or year will spring from a marriage of intention and disciplined effort rather than a reliance on fortune or familial birthright. We make a choice. We invest our time and department of energy. We reap the reward or take the collision. Whatever the result, we are constantly working on what comes future. We earn our life.Make a contract with your future. Facing new habits requires accountability. hera are the terms and conditions of our agreement : What I want us to do is abandon our puppy love with the condition quo and jettison our antipathy to every form of risk, acknowledge we are getting older ; toast to get over it and get moving.That ’ s the cover. Turn the page.

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