Nipple Piercing Guide: What To Expect From Cost To Pain

What’s the most common follow-up call you receive after you pierce someone’s nipple?
“That they’re swollen more than we foresaw and they need to come in and put a longer post in their barbell,” Thompson says. Luckily, it’s easy to swap the posts, if only until the swelling goes down. You need to come in fast if your nipple is swollen past the ball or risk other issues.

How do you care for a nipple piercing?
Gentle soap and warm water applied very gently once per day in the shower, then just allow the piercing to air-dry. Different piercers recommend different formulas, but Thompson sends everyone home with a bottle of Dr. Bronner’s Castile Soap in Tea Tree or Baby Unscented (for sensitive skin). You can pick this up at most health food stores.

We can’t stress this next part enough: Don’t touch it! That means no turning or touching the barbell — at all! Don’t let anyone else touch it, either. Wear a soft cotton bra (like a bralette or comfy sports bra), and just try to forget about it for a few weeks, short of monitoring the healing and washing it in the shower.

It’s normal for nipple piercings to get crusty, so many people opt for a daily sterile saline bath. Grab a bottle of sterile saline and a shot glass, or try Thompson’s DIY: Mix half a teaspoon of sea salt in a large mug of warm water until dissolved, then fill a shot glass or smaller mug with the mixture, cup over the nipple, and let it soak for as long as you like. “You can’t [overdo] this — it’s great for speeding up the healing process,” Thompson says. Still getting crusty after six months? Try upgrading your jewelry; it could be a light allergic reaction.

Avoid rubbing alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, ointment, or anything else you may use to treat a wound. Repeat after us: Soap, saline, soft bras — and no touching!

How do you know if your nipple is infected and you need to see a doctor, or if it’s just irritated or healing slowly?
Thompson says that an infection is not as common as you might think, and most irritation is likely from an allergic reaction to cheap jewelry, while pain and redness could be from a too-small barbell. This is what he tells his clients: An actual infection will cause a slight fever, swollen lymph nodes, or a piercing that’s red, inflamed, and painful. If something feels off, it probably is — and the nipple is no place to take risks. Call your piercer as soon as you suspect an issue and never be shy about calling your primary care physician for advice — that’s what they’re there for.

Can my new piercing cause nipple thrush?
Nipple thrush isn’t the same as your

Can you change your jewelry yourself?
“Yes, once it’s healed and you feel confident, it’s totally fine to switch out your jewelry yourself,” Thompson says. The only caveat? “Don’t take too much time to do it.” The nipple, especially in the first year, could start to close up within a few minutes. Because of this, Thompson suggests letting a pro change your jewelry the first few times.

Will the hole close if you remove the jewelry down the road?
Most of the time, even if the nipple is healed and you’ve had the piercing for years, the hole will close up — fast. There are exceptions, of course, and some holes stay open for years without jewelry, but it’s pretty uncommon. “ That they ’ re swell more than we foresaw and they need to come in and put a longer post in their barbell, ” Thompson says. Luckily, it ’ second easy to swap the posts, if only until the swell goes down. You need to come in fast if your nipple is swollen past the ball or hazard other issues.Gentle soap and warm water applied identical lightly once per day in the shower, then just allow the pierce to air-dry. different piercers recommend different formulas, but Thompson sends everyone home plate with a bottle of Dr. Bronner ‘s Castile Soap in Tea Tree or Baby Unscented ( for sensitive bark ). You can pick this up at most health food stores.We ca n’t stress this following separate enough : Do n’t touch it ! That means no turning or touching the barbell — at all ! Do n’t let anyone else touch it, either. Wear a soft cotton brassiere ( like a bralette or comfortable sports brassiere ), and just try to forget about it for a few weeks, light of monitoring the bring around and washing it in the shower.It ’ s normal for nipple piercings to get crusty, so many people opt for a daily sterile saline solution bathtub. Grab a bottle of sterile saline solution and a shoot glass, or try Thompson ‘s DIY : Mix half a teaspoon of ocean salt in a bombastic mug of warm water until dissolved, then fill a shoot glass or smaller mug with the mix, cup over the nipple, and let it soak for deoxyadenosine monophosphate long as you like. “ You can ’ deoxythymidine monophosphate [ overdo ] this — it ’ s great for speeding up the curative process, ” Thompson says. still getting crusty after six months ? Try upgrading your jewelry ; it could be a light allergic reaction.Avoid rubbing alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, cream, or anything else you may use to treat a injure. duplicate after us : soap, saline, balmy bras — and no touching ! Thompson says that an infection is not american samoa coarse as you might think, and most annoyance is likely from an allergic reaction to cheap jewelry, while pain and red could be from a too-small barbell. This is what he tells his clients : An actual infection will cause a flimsy fever, swell lymph nodes, or a acute that ‘s crimson, inflamed, and irritating. If something feels off, it probably is — and the nipple is no place to take risks. Call your piercer vitamin a soon as you suspect an write out and never be shy about calling your primary care doctor for advice — that ’ s what they ’ re there for.Nipple thrush is n’t the lapp as your typical pierce infection — yes, it ‘s an infection, but it ‘s caused by yeast. Although it ‘s possible for a pierce to trigger nipple thrush, it ‘s not likely, says Sherry Ross, MD, OB/GYN, and writer of she-ology. Just in character you do think you have nipple thrush, Dr. Ross says to keep an eye out for these symptoms : pain, swelling, inflammation, burn, itching, or prick of the nipples. She adds that the skin of the nipple could appear bright or flaky, equally well as blister. If any of that sounds like you, contact your doctor ASAP. “ Yes, once it ’ south healed and you feel confident, it ’ sulfur wholly fine to switch out your jewelry yourself, ” Thompson says. The only caution ? “ Don ’ t take besides much time to do it. ” The nipple, particularly in the first class, could start to close up within a few minutes. Because of this, Thompson suggests letting a pro change your jewelry the first few times.Most of the time, even if the nipple is healed and you ’ ve had the pierce for years, the hole will close up — fast. There are exceptions, of course, and some holes stay open for years without jewelry, but it ’ south pretty rare.

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